Why Put A Title On A Dog

Not just a brag, not just a stepping stone to a higher title, not just an adjunct to competitive scores, a title is a tribute to the dog that bears it, a way to honor the dog, an ultimate memorial. It will remain in record and in memory for as long as anything in this world can remain. Few humans will do as well or better in that regard.

And though the dog itself doesn't know or care that its achievements have been noted, a title says many things in the world of humans, where such things count.

A title says your dog was intelligent and adaptable, and good-natured. It says that your dog loved you enough to do the things that please you, however crazy they may have sometimes seemed.

And a title says that you loved your dog, that you loved to spend time with it because it was a good dog, that you believed in it enough to give it yet another chance when it failed, and that, in the end, your faith was justified.

A title proves that your dog inspired you to that special relationship enjoyed by so few; that in a world of disposable creatures, this dog with a title was greatly loved, and loved greatly in return.

And when that dear short life is over, the title remains as a memorial of the finest kind, the best you can give to a deserving friend, volumes of pride in one small set of initials after the name.

A title earned is nothing less than love and respect, given and received, and permanently recorded.

-Sandra Mowery

DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF SUSAN BUTCHER

Alaska - Where Men are Men and Women Win The Iditarod

Susan Butcher with "Granite"
Dec 26, 1954 - Aug 5, 2006

Susan Howlet Butcher was an American dog musher who modeled hard work, perseverance and dedication to future generations.Susan Butcher dominated the sport of "mushing" for over a decade, placing in the top five 12 times during her career. Winning the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race in 1986, the second four-time winner in 1990, and the first to win four out of five sequential years. She is commemorated in Alaska by the Susan Butcher Day. She has won several honors, including the National Women's Sports Foundation Amateur Athlete of The Year Award, the U.S. Victor Award and Female Athlete of the Year award.

In 2005, Susan Butcher was diagnosed with leukemia. She died on August 5, 2006 and is survived by her husband, attorney and fellow dog racer David Monson, and their two daughters, Tekla and Chisana. In 2008, the state of Alaska honored Butcher by establishing Susan Butcher Day, which is observed on the first Saturday of March.

 

Even if you come in last...you've beaten all the folks who didn't compete!
   
                                                     Lanny Basham